Intercarpal joints

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The intercarpal joints are the joints connecting the individual carpal bones at the wrist. They may be divided into the following categories:

Note that the carpal bones also articulate with the radius and triangular articular disc at the wrist, and with the metacarpal bones at the carpometacarpal joints.

The intercarpal joints are plane synovial joints. Most articular surfaces are spherical, eliptical or sellar.

Contents

Joints of the proximal row

Each adjacent carpal bone in the proximal row articulates with an adjacent partner, such that the scaphoid has an articular surface with the lunate, the lunate one with scaphoid and one with triquetral, and the triquetral one with lunate (note also the separate pisotriquetral joint).

Ligaments

A transverse palmar ligament and dorsal ligament connect the three main bones of the palmar row. The palmar ligaments tend to be weaker.

Two interosseous ligaments attach the proximal poles of scaphoid and lunate and lunate and triquetral, respectively, contributing to their articular surfaces at the wrist.

Joints of the distal row

Each adjacent carpal bone in the distal row articulates with those adjacent to it, such that the trapezium has an articular surface with the trapezoid, the trapezoid one with trapezium and one with capitate, the capitate one with trapezoid and one with hamate, and hamate one with capitate.

Ligaments

A transverse palmar ligament and dorsal ligament connect the four main bones of the distal row.

Three interosseous ligaments link between adjacent bones (trapezium and trapezoid, trapezoid and capitate, capitate and hamate); only the one between capitate and hamate is invariably present.

See also

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